#MeetMyImmigrants: Grazia Annucci

Grazia Annucci was born 6 June 1872 in Rapolla, Italy. She married at age 15 to Alfonso Morelli, a farmer in that town. They had at least six children, and Grazia was widowed at age 32. A number of her children and many of her siblings came over to the USA, all settling in NYC or Jersey City. She was meant to immigrate in 1920, having tickets aboard the S. S. Canada from Naples, with her daughter, Giulia, and son, Michele. (All were to join their son/brother, my great-grandfather Raffaele.) For some reason, Grazia and Giulia did not make this trip. Grazia wound up immigrating with a daughter-in-law and grandchild on the S. S. Dante Alighieri, which arrived at NYC 3 August 1921. She was listed as being 5'6", with brown hair and brown eyes. She seemingly lived in Jersey City, but two years after she arrived, her daughter, Giulia, died of tuberculosis. After this point, Grazia and most of her children disappear from the US records. They all returned to Italy, and spread out around the Province of Potenza. Grazia would outlive three of her children, dying in Rapolla in 1961.

As far as I know, Grazia is my only direct immigrant ancestor that returned back to her country of origin permanently.

Are you ready to meet your immigrants? Let's work together to find your roots.

Find Grazia's original post on my Facebook.

Ship manifest images from Ancestry (microfilms of the US National Archives).

#MeetMyImmigrants: Assunta "Susan" Giella

Assunta "Susan" Giella was born 31 October 1851 in Atripalda, Italy. She was one of my thirteen immigrant 2x-great-grandparents. She married Sabino di Venezia in 1875. They were farmers in Atripalda. They raised nine children (some of whom died in childhood). Assunta was widowed by 1921, and immigrated to the US to live with her sons in Jersey City. She traveled through Ellis Island with her son, Salvatore. She lived there until her death in 1935.

Are you ready to meet your immigrants? Let's work together to find your roots.

See Susan's original post on my Facebook.

Ship manifest images from Ancestry (microfilms of the US National Archives).

#MeetMyImmigrants: Giovanni Angelo Raffaele Piro

Giovanni Angelo Raffaele Piro was born 23 January 1854 in Capriglia, Pellezzano, Italy. He was one of my thirteen immigrant 2x-great-grandparents. He lost his father when he was very young - 8 years old. He married Raffaela Napoli in Baronissi in 1882. They had at least three daughters in Italy, including my great-grandmother, Fortunata "Fannie." He, his wife, and two younger daughters immigrated to America in 1904, arriving at New York City.

According to family legend, upon arrival at Ellis Island, someone in the family was sick, and had been marked with a chalk "X" on their coat (as if they were to be singled out for further inspection, and perhaps deported). My great-grandmother said that they copped on that people with these X marks were being sent elsewhere, so whoever in the family that been marked with an "X" turned their coat inside out, and there were no further problems. While I cannot confirm this story, if it is true, I may not be here but for that quick thinking. Giovanni worked as a weaver in Italy, but apparently became a piano maker when the family settled in Italian East Harlem. He died from tuberculosis in 1907, only 3 years after his arrival in the US, and when his youngest daughter, Fannie, was only 7. It's interesting, and tragic, how history repeats itself. (Lucky for us, Fannie had longevity and lived to 96!)

Are you ready to meet your immigrants? Let's work together to find your roots.

View Giovanni's original post on Facebook.

Photo from Family History Library microfilm, originally held at New York City Municipal Archives.

#MeetMyImmigrants: Annie C. Morris

Annie C. Morris was my 3x-great-grandmother. She was one of thirty-one foreign-born 3x-great-grandparents, apparently hailing from Montreal, Canada (though I have not yet confirmed the city). She was married to my only American-born 3x-great-grandparent, David Fisher, who was an active Mason, and also was in the International Order of Oddfellows and Knights of Pythias. They lived in Kingston, New York, where David worked as a tailor. Annie died shortly after the birth of her sixth child, my 2x-great-grandmother, Emma. I went to visit Annie and David in Kingston in 2015.

 

Are you ready to meet your immigrants? Let's work together to find your roots.

 

 

 

 

See Annie's original post on my Facebook.

 

Source: Newspaper article from newspapers.com (Kingston Daily Freeman, 5 January 1874)